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  • Bacterial survival strategy

    07.02.2017, EurekAlert!

    Scientists have discovered a long-term epigenetic memory switch that controls different modes of bacterial virulence, a bacterial survival strategy for outsmarting the human immune response. The study sheds new light on bacterial virulence strategies, resulting in increased disease severity, higher infection persistence, and improved host-to-host spreading.

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  • Welcome, CAET!

    02.09.2015

    COSIS.net now welcomes submissions for Creative Arts in Education and Therapy (CAET) – Eastern and Western Perspectives.

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  • Little-known quake, tsunami hazards lurk offshore of Souther

    29.05.2015, ScienceDaily

    While their attention may be inland on the San Andreas Fault, residents of coastal Southern California could be surprised by very large earthquakes -- and even tsunamis -- from several major faults that lie offshore, a new study finds.

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  • Working together to build drought resiliency

    29.05.2015, ScienceDaily

    As drought continues, and demand grows, researchers are looking to new models to improve the Rio Grande region's drought resiliency.

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  • New technique harnesses everyday seismic waves to image Eart

    29.05.2015, ScienceDaily

    Earth researchers have devised a technique that transforms the tiny tremors generated by the everyday hustle and bustle of city life into a tool for probing the subsurface of Earth.

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  • Offshore islands amplify, rather than dissipate, a tsunami's power

    07.11.2014, Science Daily

    A long-held belief that offshore islands protect the mainland from tsunamis turns out to be the exact opposite of the truth, according to a new study.

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  • Scientists examine mysterious tar mounds in the West African deep ocean

    07.11.2014, Science Daily

    More than two thousand mounds of asphalt harboring a wealth of deep-water creatures have been discovered up to two kilometers deep, off the coast of Angola. Scientists have been examining the images and data captured at the site to build an intriguing picture of the life and geology of this underwater area. The naturally-occurring asphalt mounds are made up of the same substance that covers our roads.

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  • Understanding the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake in an urban context

    07.11.2014, Science Daily

    In an urban environment, the effect of a major earthquake such as the 17 Oct. 1989 Loma Prieta event can be pieced together by the infrastructure damaged or destroyed. This study details the effects of the Loma Prieta earthquake still detectable 25 years on and sheds light on the potential damage to infrastructure from future earthquakes along the San Andreas fault or the neighboring Foothills thrust belt.

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  • Ancient rhino-relatives were water-loving

    08.10.2014, Science Daily

    The discovery of new bones from a large land mammal that lived about 48 million years ago has led scientists to identify a new branch of mammals closely related to modern horses, rhinos, and tapirs.

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  • Rivers recover natural conditions quickly following dam removal

    08.10.2014, Science Daily

    A study of the removal of two dams in Oregon suggests that rivers can return surprisingly fast to a condition close to their natural state, both physically and biologically, and that the biological recovery might outpace the physical recovery. In the end, the large pulse of sediment from dam removal simply isn't that big a problem.

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  • The heart of an astronaut, five years on

    22.07.2014, Science Daily

    The heart of an astronaut is a much-studied thing. Scientists have analyzed its blood flow, rhythms, atrophy and, through journal studies, even matters of the heart. But for the first time, researchers are looking at how oxidative stress and inflammation caused by the conditions of space flight affect those hearts for up to five years after astronauts fly on the International Space Station. Lessons learned may help improve cardiovascular health on Earth as well.

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  • NASA's HS3 mission spotlight: The HIRAD instrument

    22.07.2014, Science Daily

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, known as HIRAD, will fly aboard one of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft during NASA's Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel or HS3 mission from Wallops beginning August 26 through September 29. One of the NASA Global Hawks will cover the storm environment and the other will analyze inner-storm conditions. HIRAD will fly aboard the inner-storm Global Hawk and will be positioned at the bottom, rear section of the aircraft.

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