B2B  |  Feedback  |  COSIS.net on Facebook COSIS.net News on Twitter


Lost Login Data?

Archive



© 2000-2012 Dreamstime.

Screening of Baltic Sea pollution in Estonia

30.01.2012, Proceedings of the Estonian Academy of Sciences

A group of Estonian and Finnish environmental scientists carried out analyses of heavy metals, organic and anorganic compounds, which pollute the inland and coastal waters around the eastern Baltic Sea. Some of these toxic substances find their way into food. Their report has been published in the Proceedings of the Estonian Academy of Sciences.

more


© 2000-2012 Dreamstime.

Homogenisation improves quality of historical climate record

26.01.2012, The homepage of the Action HOME

Raw weather data, either from automatic weather stations, or human operated ones, cannot be directly used to study climate variability. The data contain various local signals that may obscure the climate signal. Examples of these local signals are the urban heat island effect, or variations in measurement methods between stations. Before the weather data can be used for climate studies, they need to be corrected. A new article in Climate of the Past reports about a Europe-wide homogenisation study.

more


© 2000-2012 Dreamstime.

Crowd-sourced science: powerful new science tool

24.01.2012, Dot Earth (NYT)

Crowdfunding, crowdcreation, crowdvoting, crowd wisdom, are different ways to involve large groups of people in solving particular problems. Crowdsourcing is rapidly becoming a very powerful addition to the toolbox of many scientists. The growth of social media, and particularly networks such as COSIS.net, is giving crowdsourcing a strong boost. (Updated 24 Jan 2012.)

more


© 2000-2012 Dreamstime.

Global warming makes E Asia winter weather more predictable

24.01.2012, Journal of Climate

The East Asian winter weather is largely influenced by the Siberian High - the most intense high pressure system on the earth. Scientists from U.S. and Taiwan found that in the past three decades the intensity of the Siberian High tended to reverse between early and middle winter, so that a mild November was often followed by a cold December and January and vice versa. Their analysis showed that this reversal is related to the multi-decadal variation of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which changed its phase from negative/cold to positive/warm in the late 1970s.

more


Courtesy ESA

Push, pull or blast? How to protect Earth from asteroids?

21.01.2012, BBC News

A new international initiative led by the German space agency DLR, NEOShield, combines expertise from science as well as the industry to avert the dangers of impact by asteroids and comets. Last week was the kick-off meeting in Berlin attended by experts from Europe, USA and Russia.

more


Courtesy NOAA

Using Microbes To Mine Manganese: Promising Prospects

09.01.2012, Bioresource Technology

Microbes can be used in all sorts of ways, from cleaning wastewater, removing oil spills and heavy metals, to producing biofuels. A promising new application is the use of microbes in mining of manganese from waste and deep sea deposits, reports a recent article by a group of Indian scientists.

more


© 2000-2011 Dreamstime.

New nuclear accident magnitude scale highlights catastrophes

05.01.2012, Physics Today

Four recent nuclear catastrophes, Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Fukushima and Kyshtum, feature prominently in a new nuclear accident magnitude scale developed by the British Emeritus Professor of Geophysics David Smythe.

more


De-Leon and Paldor (2011)

Solution to longstanding tidal equation problem

04.01.2012, Tellus

Israeli scientists have improved solutions for the famous Tidal Equations first formulated by Pierre-Simon Laplace in 1776. Their new contribution for this longstanding problem involves a new formulation of an approximate equation that, suprisingly, yields highly accurate solutions of Laplace's Equations.

more


© 2000-2011 Dreamstime.

Climate sensitivity greater than previously believed

03.01.2012, ACP

Atmospheric chemists from Sweden, Germany and the US reveal how plant emissions into the atmosphere mask the effect of human-induced greenhouse warming. Plants emit substances that produce aerosols that may have a cooling effect in one area while amplifying greenhouse warming elsewhere. When temperature rises they will do so at higher rates.

more